Sellita Caliber Sw200 1 Movement

Sellita Caliber SW200-1

Sellita Caliber Sw200 1 Movement

ManufacturerSellita
Caliber NumberSW200-1, SW-200-1
Base Caliber
SW200
Type
Automatic
Lignes
11 1/2”’
Diameter
25.6mm
Height
4.6mm thick
Jewels26
Power Reserve38 hours
Lift Angle
50 degrees
Vibrations Per Hour28,800 bph, 4Hz
Hacking?Yes
Quickset Date?Yes
FunctionsHours, minutes, central sweeping seconds, date (could be at 3, 6, 9, or 12)
Country of ManufactureSwitzerland
Known Models
Rebel Aquafin Diver, Nite Icon (Too many to list, add yours to the comments below…)

The Sellita SW200-1 is the main competitor to ETA’s 2824-2 workhorse. It is considered to be a 2824 clone. The SW200-1 is an update to the original caliber SW200.

Many reputable watch companies are using this movement as an alternative to the ETA mechanism due to it being more economical and readily available.

You may have seen this movement written as the SW-200 but according to Sellita, the correct way to spell this caliber number is SW200 without a hyphen.

4 Grades of SW200-1:

Just like the ETA caliber 2824-2, there are four grades of the SW200-1 movement:

  • Standard – adjusted in two positions; accuracy of +/-12 sec/day up to +/- 30 sec/day
  • Special (Elabore) – adjusted in three positions; accuracy of +/-7 sec/day up to +/- 20 sec/day
  • Premium (Top) – adjusted in five positions; accuracy of +/-4 sec/day up to +/- 15 sec/day
  • Chronometer – COSC criteria

How to tell the difference between grades?

One way to distinguish between Standard/Special and Premium/COSC grades of the SW200-1 is to look at the anti-shock device:

StandardNovodiac
SpecialNovodiac
PremiumIncabloc
ChronometerIncabloc

Sellita Date Codes:

Under the balance wheel, near the caliber number engraving, you may have seen what looks to be a laser etched code containing DM and XYZ.

  • DM means that the movement origin is from Sellita Watch Co.
  • XYZ is a Sellita code (we’re not sure the meaning, comment below if you know)

As for the date part of the code, new movements produced in 2018 look like this:

  • DM18.1/XYZ = JAN+FEB
  • DM18.2/XYZ = MAR+APRIL
  • DM18.3/XYZ = MAY+JUNE
  • DM18.4/XYZ = JULY+AUG
  • DM18.5/XYZ = SEPT+OCT
  • DM18.6/XYZ = NOV+DEC

There is also a code for what Sellita refers to as “Renewed Movements”. The meaning of this still needs to be confirmed, but it appears that this is for movements that were sent back to Sellita for renewal. Perhaps brands are able to buy them at a discount. We still don’t know, but please check your movement for a two digit number starting with 2X. For reference:

Renewed Movements
A 2-digit customer service code is engraved to show that the movement has been renewed.
20 for 2020, 21 for 2021, etc.

Case study pics coming soon.

Crown/Stem Removal:

Official Sellita documentation states that the crown should be in the time setting position before being extracted. Use a 1mm screw-driver, avoid using tweezers or any other tool with a point because this could jam the setting lever and damage the setting lever spring.

Ratchet Wheel Issues:

The primary reason behind the evolution from SW200 to SW200-1 was to fix an issue with the teeth of the ratchet wheel breaking off, perhaps while hand-winding the movement. There are skeptics who question whether these problematic parts are a direct result of hand-winding, but as with many topics in the watch community, it is a topic that is debated between those who have experienced the issue (or repaired the issue) and those who have not. Likewise, experiences with the ETA 2824-2 having similar issues is also split with some saying they have experienced it, and others pointing to how ETA holds a patent for a ratchet wheel that is less prone to teeth stripping by design.

Regardless, the ratchet wheel teeth issue that was supposed to be remedied in the original SW200 is still experienced in the SW200-1. This isn’t to say one should avoid the SW200-1, but it is advisable to avoid aggressively or excessively hand-winding your SW200-1 watches as much as possible. Aggressive or excessive force is subjective, but what is generally not as subjective is the function of the automatic winding unit, which delivers a more consistent and regulated dose of energy to the ratchet wheel. Hence, the suggestion to minimize manual (and unregulated) winding of the SW200-1.

What is it?

The gold tone ratchet wheel with 63 teeth is located above the mainspring barrel. This wheel is attached to the barrel’s arbor via a single screw. It is responsible for transferring energy to wind/coil the mainspring. The energy is stored (power reserve) and released (time keeping). The stored energy is a result of either manually winding the movement via the crown, or from the spinning of the rotor on the automatic wind unit.

How to diagnose a broken ratchet wheel?

The easiest way to tell that teeth have been sheared or stripped from the ratchet wheel is by visually examining it. You may also feeling of slipping when manually winding the movement. Additionally, the watch will have dramatic loss of power reserve because of not being able to transfer full energy to the mainspring.

What to look for:

Sellita Caliber SW200-1 Drawings

Sellita SW200-1 drawings

Examples of the Sellita caliber SW200-1:

The image below is a chronometer grade (COSC certified) Sellita SW200-1 found in a Formex Essence watch.

Sellita Sw200 1 Cosc Grade Chronometer

The image below is of a Sellita caliber SW200-1 found in a Pharos Sentinel watch.

Sellita Caliber Sw200 1 Wide

Additional Resources:

You are reading Caliber Corner, the most popular resource for watch movement pics, specs and opinions, including mods and DIY repairs. CC is a watch geek community for gear turning and caliber learning! Check the front page for the latest caliber listings and follow Caliber Corner on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. Subscribe to our YouTube channel for close-up movement videos. Join our mission to spread movement awareness. Sign up!
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Josh Lowe
Josh Lowe
1 year ago

I believe I have watches with this movement, but I also think most sites state SW200 and not SW200-1 even if has an SW200-1 so I have no idea unless I open up my watch. If there is a difference enough for Sellita to add a 1 to the number then there is probably difference enough for companies to state the correct movement, don’t you think?

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Sellita Caliber SW200 VS. SW200-1 Watch Movement | CaliberCorner.com
1 year ago

[…] three components pictured above, all other parts of the caliber SW200 are interchangeable with the SW200-1. When performing maintenance or repair, these three components should be changed together to […]

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1 year ago

[…] you are used to the Miyota caliber 9015 or modern Swiss automatic movements like the ETA 2824-2 or Sellita SW200-1, they beat at a higher rate (28,800 bph 4Hz) than the Miyota which beats at 21,600, so you may be […]

Paul Hamilton
Paul Hamilton
1 year ago

I thought Sellita uses Incabloc, but that isn’t Incabloc in the picture.

Gina Ult
Gina Ult
1 year ago
Reply to  Paul Hamilton

That’s Novodiac made by Incabloc company.

Clinton Smith
Clinton Smith
1 year ago
Augustus
Augustus
1 year ago
Reply to  Clinton Smith

Wow, USD1.145 for this ugly piece of junk?

Salomon Matos Jr
Salomon Matos Jr
1 year ago
Reply to  Augustus

That’s borderline criminal. Some of these hollow brands are just trying to take advantage of the ignorant/new watch enthusiasts. It’s a shame.

Clinton Smith
Clinton Smith
1 year ago

I have the watch, but I received it through a subscription to Watch Gang, which is $299/month. I think that’s primarily how people would get this one.

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1 year ago

[…] TAG Heuer Calibre 5 automatic watch movement can be based on either an ETA caliber 2824-2 or Sellita caliber SW200-1. Most, but not all of the Caliber 5 movements feature Côtes de Genève decorating on the rotor, […]

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Chris
Chris
1 year ago

My Oris 01 733 7613 4114-07 8 24 75 uses he SW200-1 movement. I’ve has the watch 10 years (albeit rarely use it), never serviced and after a week it’ll be 6 second fast according to the World time clock. A reliable if somewhat an undesirable movement.

Jason Ruggless
Jason Ruggless
1 year ago

You asked for folks to mention if they own a watch with the SW200-1. My Ginault has one. I screwed up the original movement trying to adjust the beat rate. I sent it back to Ginault and told them I screwed it up. They tried to adjust but felt anymore time was not cost effective and asked if they could put in the SW200-1. I have no problems with this movement so I said yes.… Read more »

Franco
Franco
4 months ago
Reply to  Jason Ruggless

Yes they’ll be trying to get all those fake “American made” Chinese 2824 copies out of circulation no doubt! 😉 I think some of them worked ok but mine was a complete donkey from day one losing up to a minute a day and sometimes stopping all together. Servicing did no good so I’ve just stuck a Sellita in and it’s running at +1s per day. Now it works as good as it looks!

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1 year ago

[…] The Oris caliber 733 is an automatic movement based on the Sellita caliber SW200-1. […]

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Tom b
Tom b
1 year ago

A ton of entry-level Tudor’s use ETA 2824…If I’m not mistaken a lot of these companies modify and refinish the movement once they have them. I think that’s why a lot of brands use their own caliber name to look different but are based off of ETA/sellita movements.

Bart
Bart
11 months ago

I had two watches with the Sellita SW200-1 experiencing winding issues. The first was obviously missing teeth from the 2 winding gears. You could see gaps in the wheel as it turned and that made it skip when manually winding the mechanism. I have no idea how this could happen. The other watch looked like the teeth were 100% intact but manually winding the mechanism gave a skipping sensation and would not wind it up.… Read more »

Mus
Mus
7 months ago
Reply to  Bart

Yes I had similar experience as well.

Bart
Bart
11 months ago

Is ETA made by Sellita or the other way around?

Dan t
Dan t
11 months ago
Reply to  Bart

2 completely different movement makers

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Lou
Lou
10 months ago

You list the Rebel Aquafin Diver in the known models. I have one of these watches and I can’t wind it. The issue is that it like skips around or slips when winding. Does anyone know why or how this could be possible? Other people complained about it too, but instead of complaining, I just want to know why and how they managed to have this movement unable to wind. I had an Oris with… Read more »

watchreviewguy
watchreviewguy
8 months ago
Reply to  Lou

I don’t have an answer for you but I have the same thing on my Rebel Aquafin with this movement. It runs ok but it won’t wind right. What I’m wondering is if Rebel didn’t just buy a box of broken movements, or they didn’t know how to work with them without fudging them up, or are they even real Sellita movements dare I even say it?

Keepthetime
KeepTheTime.com
9 months ago

Sellita caliber SW200-1 found in this Nite Icon tritium dial watch:

SW200-1 in a Nite Icon watch

Gary T Trevisan
Gary T Trevisan
8 months ago

My Hamtun H2 Kraken has this elabore movement as an upgrade. 28,800 bph. Accuracy over 5 days, 22 measurements is +0.40 sec/day.

Justin
Justin
7 months ago
Reply to  Caliber Corner

My Lum-Tec B43 Phantom Destro has the SW200-1. Love it.

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Dale Housley
Dale Housley
6 months ago

I just got a LIV (Livwatches.com) GX!-A Cobalt, and it has the Sellita SW200-1.

Ed Shaffer
Ed Shaffer
6 months ago

Bulova Accutron Curacao 65B134 has this movement. Additionally, I wasn’t aware of the gear stripping until I read this article. I replaced the movement once a few years back due to the crown stripping. Now it’ll wind, but skip after a few turns. At least now I know why and to either get a winder or only wind enough to get it going. Just read Meistersinger uses this movement as well. Love the brand, but… Read more »

Mike DeLio
Mike DeLio
6 months ago

The Shinola Bronze Monster has this movement. It’s helpful to know about the stripping issue. I’ve been wearing mine for a few months now nonstop, so haven’t had to manually wind the movement yet.

Ed Shaffer
Ed Shaffer
6 months ago

Christopher Ward uses this movement in many of their dive watches. I have two unfortunately with one now exhibiting this manual wind gear issue. I started to review my collection after my Accutron post earlier. Shop carefully friends. This movement is 150-200 USD to replace, so use scrutiny when looking to buy from brands using these movements. If you rotate watches frequently and have to manually wind to get the watch going, my recommendation is… Read more »

Phil
Phil
6 months ago
Reply to  Ed Shaffer

Almost certainly the reversing wheels, cleaning usually fixes it but replacement is only about £15 for the pair from cousins. If you feel up to doing it is a pretty simple job. My Christopher Ward Trident needed them doing but it was still under the 5 year warranty so it was sorted no problem.

Wostepper
Wostepper
6 months ago
Reply to  Phil

Ratchet wheel broken teeth issue causes slipping when manually winding and no energy getting to the mainspring, if the caseback is open you can see the teeth broke off. Reversing wheel issue causes the rotor to spin wildly when manually winding, cleaning the reversing wheels usually fixes it but make sure to lube also.

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Ken V.
Ken V.
5 months ago

My newer Glycine Combat Sub 42mm has this 26Jewel SW 200-1 movement. Glycine calls it their “GL224” movement. Apparently at some point in the recent past they actually used to use the ETA-branded 2824 auto movement, but in recent years started using these due to supply limitations from Swatch Group, I have heard? I bought it from Costco for $289 new in Oct 2019, but before ever reading about this apparent gear stripping issue. So… Read more »

Ken V.
Ken V.
5 months ago
Reply to  Caliber Corner

Thanks. Good info. I have never had the solid case back off mine, so don’t know if it has any Glycine logo or other etched info on the rotor. Accuracy has been very good at no more than about +5sec per day.

Hoyafan
Hoyafan
4 months ago
Reply to  Ken V.

So that’s how Glycine is putting out lower cost watches. Thanks for info, I love my Glycines

Glen Danford
Glen Danford
4 months ago
Reply to  Hoyafan

Cost hasn’t changed that I’ve noticed, it’s simply a matter of availability, and there is nothing whatsoever wrong with a Sellita movement, the SW200 is an improvment

Scott M
Scott M
4 months ago
Reply to  Ken V.

I have the same watch. Just as the two year warranty was running out, the watch would not take a full wind – the winder would start to spin the rotor and eventually stop winding altogether. What junk. And this was the elabore version of the 2824 or the SW equivalent. Very disappointed.

Ken V.
Ken V.
4 months ago
Reply to  Scott M

Scott, That is too bad. There are threads on this forum that discuss some issues like yours, and saw mention of a reversing gear likely needing cleaning and/or lubrication to stop the rotor from catching and spinning while handwinding the watch. Also there is a more widely reported problem on some of these ETA-clone Sellita movements, with breaking or stripping of some teeth on the large brass winding gear. This was supposedly an initial issue… Read more »

Scott M
Scott M
3 months ago
Reply to  Ken V.

Ken V. Thanks for the info. I’m doing exactly what you mentioned – gently winding a few rotations just to get the movement going. The warranty ran out in April. I’m tempted to take the back off and poke around, perhaps with the addition of a little WD40, but I quickly came to my senses. Besides, many manufactures frown upon laymen tinkering with the mechanics. I’ll contact Massdrop where I bought the watch and perhaps… Read more »

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Dawid Krajanowski
Dawid Krajanowski
4 months ago

Hi Guys can you tell me balance wheel from Sellita can fit ETA movement?

thanks

Adrian
Adrian
4 months ago

Are you wondering about the complete balance with the bridge attached or just the balance wheel? Some of the parts can be used between SW200-1/ETA 2824-2 but not all. What exactly do you want to do?

Dawid Krajanowski
Dawid Krajanowski
4 months ago
Reply to  Adrian

hello. Thank you for reply.
I meant whole piece with bridge.
find out all ready that bridge is a little different

Adrian
Adrian
4 months ago

You are right. The entire balance bridge is a little different and I do not think it can be replaced with an 2824-2 balance bridge. What will you do now?

Red
Red
2 months ago

I own a Bulova Accu-Swiss Tellaro with this movement and am averaging around +6 sec. a day. I am happy with it and truly enjoy wearing the watch.

robert
robert
2 months ago

Another watch with the SW200-1: 2019 (2020?) model, Louis Erard Heritage Classic. When i bought it, it was losing 8 sec/day. Took the back off and adjusted the balance wheel screw: it’s now keeping time within 1 sec/day! 🙂

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Lewis
Lewis
18 days ago

Is it worth it to get the cosc version? Like should I switch my regular sw200.1 for the cosc one? Thanks

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