Tissot Caliber Powermatic 80

Tissot Caliber Powermatic 80

Tissot Caliber Powermatic 80

Manufacturer Tissot
Caliber Number Powermatic 80, Powermatic 80.111, PM80
Base Caliber
ETA C07.111 (based on the ETA 2824-2)
Lignes
11.5”’
Diameter
25.6mm
Height
4.6mm (needs confirmed)
Jewels 23 or 25
Power Reserve 80 hours
Lift Angle
Unknown
Vibrations Per Hour 21,600 bph, 3Hz
Anti-Shock
Novodiac by Incabloc
Rotor Style
Ball bearing
Regulator
None
Hacking? Yes
Hand-Windable? Yes
Functions Hours, minutes, central seconds, date (3:00 or 6:00)
Country of Manufacture Switzerland
Known Models
Tissot Luxury, Tissot Seastar 1000, Tissot Carson Premium, Tissot Chemin Des Tourelles, Tissot Le Locle, Tissot Gentleman, Tissot Tradition Open Heart, Tissot Ballade COSC, Tissot Couturier, Tissot PR 100, Tissot PRC 200, Tissot Lady Heart Flower

The Tissot Powermatic 80 is a Swiss Made self-winding automatic movement with 23-25 jewels. It is found in various Tissot models and is based on the ETA caliber C07 series, which itself is based on the legendary ETA caliber 2824-2. This caliber was announced at Baselworld 2012.

Almost Mysterious:

Tissot offers almost no information about the Powermatic 80 or the ETA base calibers. The official Tissot site provides large images of each movement, but they do a good job of hiding the ETA caliber designation near the balance wheel. The image above was one of the few available with a blurry glimpse at the base caliber number. Furthermore, ETA does not provide any official documentation on the C07 series, and these movements appear to be exclusive to Swatch Group brands only (as is currently the case for all ETA mechanical movements).

Power Reserve:

This caliber’s claim to fame is the high 80 hours power reserve. In contrast, the standard ETA 2824-2 is rated at about 38 hours power reserve when fully wound. Obtaining an 80 power reserve was achieved with the combination of a more efficient spring barrel and reducing the frequency from 4Hz to 3Hz. This means that the PM80 beats at 21,600 bph compared to a 2824-2 beating at 28,800.

No Regulator:

The Powermatic 80 is not equipped with an ETAChron or other type of regulating system. Similar to the Sistem51, the Powermatic 80 laser regulated at the factory. This is what Tissot refers to as their “High-Tech” escapement. This doesn’t necessarily mean that the movement is impossible to adjust or service, but good luck finding parts or a watchmaker who will want to work on it. This is something for hardcore mechanical watch lovers to take into consideration before spending $1,000+ on a two-tone Tissot Luxury.

ETA C07 Base Movement:

As mentioned above, the Tissot Powermatic 80 movements are based on the ETA caliber C07 series. At the time of this post, there are at least four variations of the C07 (C07.111, C07.141, C07.611, C07.651, C07.811) being used in Tissot timepieces labeled Powermatic 80, but Tissot does not give clear indication which models are powered by which version. We’re doing our best to gather as much information as possible to keep this list updated. Here’s what we have so far:

How to tell the difference?

An easy way to distinguish the difference between the base calibers in Tissot Powermatic 80 models is to look at the features and/or text on the rotor:

Powermatic 80.111 (ETA C07.111)

  • Features: Date at 3:00 or 6:00
  • Rotor: High-Tech Escapement / Twenty-Three 23 Jewels / Swiss Made

Powermatic 80.111 COSC (ETA C07.111 COSC grade)

  • Features: Date at 3:00 or 6:00
  • Rotor: High-Tech Escapement / Twenty-Three 23 Jewels / Swiss Made

Note: The dial or caseback will have Certified Chronometer text, but not the rotor.

Powermatic 80.121 (ETA C07.141)

  • Features: Day at 3:00 or wide date at 12:00, date at 3:00 or wide date at 6:00
  • Rotor (black): High-Tech Escapement / Twenty-Three 23 Jewels / Swiss Made

Note: Tissot shows the caliber 80.121 as being in the Couturier (day at 12 and date at 6) as well as the PRC 200 (day and date at 3), but the calendar layout is different enough to call for different caliber numbers and the images show an ETA C07.141 base movement in the Courturier and an ETA C07.111 base in the PRC 200.

Another Note: Although the image of the movement in the Couturier looks like ETA C07.141, it’s partially covered by the balance. As of this post, there is absolutely nothing to be found about this caliber number anywhere online. If you have a watch with this movement, please confirm in the comments below if we have the correct ETA caliber number.

Powermatic 80.601 (ETA C07.111)

  • Features: Date at 3:00 or 6:00
  • Rotor (black): High-Tech Escapement / Twenty-Five 25 Jewels / Swiss Made

Powermatic 80.661 (ETA C07.651)

  • Features: Open escapement at 12:00
  • Rotor (black): Twenty-Five 25 Jewels / Swiss Made

Powermatic 80.811 (ETA C07.811)

  • Features: Silicium hairspring, date at 3:00
  • Rotor: Silicon Balance Spring / Twenty-Five 25 Jewels / Swiss Made

Powermatic 80.811 COSC (ETA C07.811 COSC grade)

  • Features: Certified Chronometer, Silicium hairspring, “Si” logo near the balance wheel, date at 3:00 or 6:00
  • Rotor: Silicon Balance Spring / Chronometer / Swiss Made / Twenty-Five 25 Jewels

Plastic Parts:

There is confusion about whether or not the Powermatic 80 movement uses plastic parts (similar to the Sistem51). First, it’s important to acknowledge that there is more than one Powermatic 80 caliber. For example, The Tissot Luxury line has the Powermatic 80.111 with 23 jewels and uses plastic parts. The COSC rated Powermatic 80.811 found in the Tissot Ballade does not.

ARCAP Inside?

Ever since the release of the Powermatic 80, there has been speculation in the watch industry as to the materials they used to make it. Following the release of the Swatch caliber Sistem51, a movement made entirely of ARCAP, an alloy of copper, nickel and zinc, the Powermatic 80 is believed to be constructed (at least in part) from similar a material. If this is true, it would give the movement resistance against magnetism.

Silicon Balance Spring:

Furthering the resistance to magnetism is the use of a patented silicon balance spring in some Tissot Powermatic 80 models. As mentioned above, movements containing the silicon balance spring will have it written on the rotor, but you can also find a Silicium logo (Si) near the balance wheel. Silicium is another word for silicon, Si is the symbol for silicon on the periodic table of elements.

Tissot Powermatic80 Silicium Video:

Additional Resources:

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The ETA shortage has started for real (and what is Sellita place in this) - Page 5
5 years ago

[…] uses plastic parts. The COSC rated Powermatic 80.811 found in the Tissot Ballade does not.”Tissot Caliber Powermatic 80 Watch Movement | CaliberCorner.com Today would be a good day to delete your Facebook account: Here is […]

Paul
Paul
4 years ago

The very reason I shifted to Tissot diver (TISSOT SEASTAR 1000 POWERMATIC 80. T120.407.11.051.00) from Seiko solar diver that is also little cheaper. Put now I read this about plastic? It seems that research reveals that COSC is not available in the Tissot diver that is all metal movement. So now I’m back in the search and Seiko is also under consideration again. Tissot with all metal and 80 hours of power reserve can justify the price difference but not plastic. OK this is just one review and I will see if there are other reviews with same facts presented… Read more »

H. j. Klaus
H. j. Klaus
4 years ago
Reply to  Paul

You refer to Silizium with the term plastic, implying that it is lower qualtity. The Silizium Technology allows to adjust the wheel to the movement. It’s abrasive quality is higher than metal and it is antimagnetic. Over all it makes the watches preciser. These qualities are the reason, why Omega as an example could expand it’s garanty to 5 years. I’m proud to have my first Silizium-Movement in a Mido Chronometer. The blind rejection reminds me of a conservative view that prefers the old over the progress. Watch technology did and will always change.

Bobby Allred
Bobby Allred
4 years ago
Reply to  H. j. Klaus

New, or different, does not necessarily mean progress.

George Iritz
George Iritz
2 years ago
Reply to  Bobby Allred

Klaus specifically noted why it is better.

His argument was not “it’s new hence better.”

Anyone can read that. It’s unfortunate…

Dan
Dan
4 years ago
Reply to  H. j. Klaus

Silicon is used in the hairspring of the high-end PM80 and is marked with the Si logo and 25 jewels. That is a different movement than the one we are talking about in the Seastar, which has a metal hairspring and does have a Plastic Pallet wheel and lever and is marked 23 Jewels. It is a fact that the basic PM80 in the Tissot and Certina models contain PLASTIC PARTS, not Silicon. Why? The movement is not designed to be serviced. As oils dry up, metal parts will wear faster and seize up, while plastic parts will keep moving… Read more »

HJK
HJK
4 years ago
Reply to  Dan

You talk about the cheapest Tissot automatics, which use the movement from the the System-Watch. I never considered that and and I talk about the better movements. Plastic sounds cheap, Silizium sounds like progress!

Dan
Dan
4 years ago
Reply to  HJK

No, the cheapest Tissot’s like the Everytime use the ETA Caliber 902.101, which is a derivative of the System 51. These are very, very low end movements, but they also have the same plastic escapement parts of the PM 80 C07.111, which is a much better movement based on the ETA 2824. Also the low-end Tissot Chronograph use plastic escapements in the ETA Caliber C01.211

Lee
Lee
2 years ago
Reply to  Dan

The system 51 is not based on the ETA 2824.

Dan
Dan
11 months ago
Reply to  Lee

Huh? Who said it was?

Rob
Rob
1 year ago
Reply to  HJK

The cheapest Tissots use what they call a “swissmatic” movement which is fully machine assembled and was a derivation of the system 51 caliber, which is, indeed, non-serviceable (disposable) and cannot be regulated.

It has nothing to do with the powermatic 80, which is serviceable, and can be regulated.

Rob
Rob
1 year ago
Reply to  Dan

“Designed not to be serviced”. That is not true. Mido, Certina, Hamilton and Tissot will service your watch. Or you can do it yourself: https://youtu.be/0IfezaKoHds Additionally, the powermatic 80 movement can be regulated with screws by any watchmaker or knowledgeable amateur https://youtu.be/oPf042EIyF0. Not that it needs it, my Mido Oceanstar GMT is within COSC specs. since I bought it over a year ago. Powermatic 80 even on its entry level tiers rocks, it’s like the Nissan GT-R of the horology world, and of course Ferrari and Lamborghini owners will feel threatened by the faster cheaper better performing car and poo… Read more »

Dan
Dan
11 months ago
Reply to  Rob

So to clarify, I was just talking about the Tissot basic variant of the PM with the plastic parts.You are right that it could be serviced if you really want, probably only by Swatch. But would it be practical? The cost would probably be almost the same as what it cost new! That is what I meant…

Rob
Rob
1 year ago
Reply to  Paul

Only boomers think metal is exclusively the way to go. They also like all stainless steel revolvers, and look down on modern polymer guns.

Don’t be a boomer, keep an open mind and judge things on their own merits.

Carbon fiber, ceramics, titanium, silicon, nivachron, dyneema and kevlar (for straps and bands) and many other advances in materials science have shown they work better for horology. Plastics don’t wear more than metal, many wear dramatically less. Additionally, some plastics are self lubricating not requiring traditional maintenance/lubrication, or not as often. Furthermore, they’re not sensitive to magnetic fields nor temp. changes.

John Russell
John Russell
5 months ago
Reply to  Rob

You make silly generalizations about boomers. My “boomer” wife and I drive a Modified Ford Fiesta ST and a Coyote 460 HP Mustang GT/CS. A Turbo 4 and an old school muscle car V8. Keep in mind many engine parts are plastic on both cars. We are 71 years old and each have numerous automatic watches, one Swiss Alpha purchased in 1970 and I just purchased a Tissot Ballade COSC. I also have SS guns for longevity and do not like the feel of polymer pistols as it increases recoil and ugly as heck, I prefer an all steel 1911 style… Read more »

Joaquin Bellis
Joaquin Bellis
4 months ago
Reply to  John Russell

Your gun selection tells me you’re a fud

Greg
Greg
4 years ago

Not plastic – but this:- Silicon (also known as silicium) found a new place in watchmaking and has gained momentum in the last decade or so. This material has incredible resilience when it comes to shock and is impervious to magnetic interference. Watchmakers are seeing the value in adopting this versatile material that is lighter yet harder than steel into their engineering. It improves stability, performance, accuracy, and resistance to magnetic interferences and thermal fluctuations. It also can keep its shape forever and never requires any lubrication. The most common use of silicon in a watch movement is the balance… Read more »

Alexander Baumgartl
Alexander Baumgartl
1 year ago
Reply to  Greg

Sehr gut erklärt – danke!

Andrew
Andrew
4 years ago

The Powermatic 80.111 operates at 3hz not 4hz so its actually 21,600 bph.

Rafael
Rafael
4 years ago

As a rule, if the (powermatic 80) caliber bears 23 jewels it should have a low friction plastic escapament. If it bears 25 may not. Those two jewels being the ones attached on the pallets.

The ETA C07.111 bears 23 jewels
The ETA C07.811 bears 25 jewels (and perhaps a sillicium balance spring)

Wolf
Wolf
4 years ago
Reply to  Rafael

Silizium is not a plastic. Silizium is a metalloid.

Just trying to kill the misinformation.

Dan
Dan
4 years ago
Reply to  Rafael

Tissot, Certina: ETA C07.111. “Hi-Tech” (Plastic) Escapement, Standard Metal Hairspring 23 J.
Hamilton, Mido, Rado: ETA C07.611 Standard Metal/Ruby Escapement, Standard Metal Hairspring 25J
All Swatch Group Brands: ETA C07.811 Standard Metal/Ruby Escapement, Anti-Magnetic Silicon Hairspring 25J

PM 80 Chronographs:
C07.111 (Plastic & Metal) 23J
Tissot PR100, Tissot Chemin Des Tourelles, Tissot Luxury, Certina DS-1

ETA C07.621 (Metal & Metal) 25J
Mido Commander Chronometer

C07.811 (Metal & Silicon) 25J
Tissot Ballad Si Chronometer, Mido Baroncelli Si Chronometer, Mido Multifort Si Chronometer

Nathan Cooper
Nathan Cooper
2 years ago
Reply to  Dan

I’m so sure your information is correct obtaining to the ETA C07.611
Certina uses this movement in their DS Action Diver and according to their site, the movement used a Nivachron balance spring. It does have 25 jewels, so I’m not 100% sure whether it uses the plastic escapement or not.

F99222BE-6843-403D-AEEB-00F0EEBFB34A.jpeg
Nathan Cooper
Nathan Cooper
2 years ago
Reply to  Nathan Cooper

Sorry about the typo, I meant to say “ I’m not sure your information is correct “

Rob
Rob
1 year ago
Reply to  Dan

ETA 07.611 is NOT a standard metal escapement/hairspring, when used by Hamilton, MIDO and Rado, thy use Nivachron, which is a titanium alloy. Titanium is not magnetic, hence the improved antimagnetic properties.

Dan
Dan
1 year ago
Reply to  Rob

I use the term “standard” here in place of “conventional.” Meaning metal escapements as opposed to silicon or plastic. The last time I checked, Titanium alloy is a metal. Prior to recently developing Nivachron with Audemars Piguet in 2018, ETA used predominately Nivorox (Nickel-Iron Alloy) in most of their movements since at least 1984, including in the Powermatic 80. While Silicon is anti-magnetic, it is relatively fragile and prone to breaking when handled improperly during assembly or servicing. The recent move to Nivachron shows that metal-based alloys are generally superior to “high tech” materials like silicon or plastics in watch… Read more »

Rob
Rob
1 year ago
Reply to  Dan

I use the term “standard” as “standard”. Nivachron is not standard.

Thang Bui
Thang Bui
4 years ago

Anyone knows if I can swap C07.111 with ETA 2824-2?
I have a Tissot Le Locle with PM80, and I want to swap out the movement for ETA 2824-2. Is it even possible? Any specific changes/modifies needed to be done?
Thanks for your help.

Wolf
Wolf
4 years ago
Reply to  Thang Bui

In my opinion the ETA C07.111 is a superior movement compared to the ETA 2824-2 so I’m wondering why you feel the need to swap?

Kelvin
Kelvin
4 years ago
Reply to  Wolf

Probably because it can’t be serviced or repaired lol. Great option for a broken powermatic 80, just pop in a 2824!

Wolf
Wolf
4 years ago

I have the Powermatic 80 ETA C07.111 in the Certina DS PH200M. It uses a Silizium escapement. I’ve had it exactly one month and I’ve been wearing it the whole time. It runs at 0/+0.7 spd on average and it has been up to +1.4 spd. It’s an amazingly precise movement; and yes, I know luck has its part to play in such accuracy and that it will differ from piece to piece. However, it’s running better than an Omega Master Chronometer and for that I’m very pleased. It’s a piece that I will be keeping permanently. There’s no plastic… Read more »

Wolf
Wolf
4 years ago
Reply to  Wolf

I forgot to mention that it runs at 21,600. Perfectly fine by me.

Wolf
Wolf
4 years ago
Reply to  Wolf

Correction: it uses a synthetic escapement of the “plastic” variety. No problems here.

Robert Corbett
Robert Corbett
3 years ago
Reply to  Wolf

Why bother….. plenty of very good cost effective and reliable Japanese movements that beat at 21,600 the whole point of paying up for a swiss movement was the higher beat rate to get that silky smooth second hand sweep motion? The newer Japanese automatics also hack and hand wind as well.

Wolf
Wolf
3 years ago
Reply to  Robert Corbett

Why? Because it’s a fantastic watch. 9 months later and it’s accuracy hasn’t altered in the slightest.
It’s a great watch and can be had at a good price.

Phil Spencelayh
Phil Spencelayh
3 years ago
Reply to  Robert Corbett

I have a few Japanese watches, really good value. I also have 8 Swiss watches, much more expensive but much better in operation. You largely get what you pay for.

Rob
Rob
1 year ago

I agree on the quality side of the argument. My Miyota and Seiko movements are not as good as their swiss equivalents. The 6R35A movement from Seiko, for example, is considered by many as in the same rough price/performance category as the powermatic 80 in its entry level tiers, and IMO the powermatic 80 is perceivably better. The fact that you can get a Tissot gentleman Silicium for under US$500, with the better version of the powermatic 80 (a COSC grade movement) does break your argument from a price perspective, as most Seikos using the 6R35A cost above US$600-700 (like… Read more »

Dan
Dan
4 years ago
Reply to  Wolf

Sorry to burst your bubble, but your watch uses a Powermatic 80.111. Re-read the description above. It uses plain old PLASTIC for the pallet fork and wheel. That’s why it only has 23 Jewels, instead of 25. The 80.811 is the movement that has metal parts with the 2 rubie pallet stones, and a Silicon hairspring. You can tell it by the Si logo on the movement. The Tissot and the Certina are the only versions of the Powermatic that use a plastic Pallet fork and wheel.

Bez
Bez
4 years ago
Reply to  Dan

Hi, I just got a Tissot with the 80.111 movement as a gift and I’m wondering if the plastic parts will wear out? Should I change to a version with 80.811 movement? I’m new to world of mechanical watches so forgive my ignorance.

Wolf
Wolf
4 years ago
Reply to  Bez

Hi, If you listen to watch snobs then your watch is junk. However, if you take the middle road then you will see that it’s just fine and should last you many many years; you may even appreciate the movement for what it does. If you’re new to all of this then you will quickly observe that this hobby is packed with snobs who have unrealistic expectations for a wristwatch and who judge all watches, owned by other people no less, from the perspective of their own likes and dislikes; and sweeping generalisation are good for nothing. Never mention the… Read more »

Dan
Dan
4 years ago
Reply to  Wolf

It’s really not about being a “watch snob” and more about being a knowledgable enthusiast that sees beyond the marketing hype.

Dan
Dan
4 years ago
Reply to  Bez

Ya get what you pay for… I’d steer clear of plastic parts in the most critical part of the watch. The timing will be affected as the plastic parts wear, and eventually they may become brittle and break. But you can’t adjust it – no regulator! It’s designed for people that are mostly interested in the lowest price, don’t plan to service a watch and just chuck it when it stops. That being said, the base model with the plastic parts will still probably last a several years even with daily use, and longer if you wear it infrequently. Bu,… Read more »

Rob
Rob
1 year ago
Reply to  Dan

Of course it can be maintained and regulated. https://youtu.be/oPf042EIyF0

Rob
Rob
1 year ago
Reply to  Bez

Plastic doesn’t wear out more than metal. In many cases it wears less, particularly for plastics with self lubricating properties (such as the ones used in watches). It is also non-magnetic, it isn’t temperature sensitive, it doesn’t rust, it’s light, and it can be cheaper (but can also be way more expensive, like Dyneema). There’s a reason why the aeronautics industry, the sports car industry, gun manufacturers, high end bycicles and many other industries replaced metals with ceramics, carbon fiber, synthetic materials. Too bad some of the older generations still think metal is the only quality material, and weight means… Read more »

Humberto B
Humberto B
11 months ago
Reply to  Rob

I am mech eng. I totally agree with your arguments. The high tech plastics are totally way better! If not , they would not have precision and resistance! Ias wolf said, if you see it on airplanes then they are beyond any doubt!

Albert Gallagher
Albert Gallagher
4 years ago
Reply to  Dan

Not true, the Hamilton Khaki field watches also employ the powermatic 80.111 movement (they refer to it as the H10).

Dan
Dan
4 years ago

Tissot, Certina use C07.111 variant of the base 80.111 (plastic escapement & metal hairspring) 23J.
Mido, Hamilton, Rado use C06.111 variant of the base 80.111 (metal/ruby escapement & metal hairspring) 25J

Dan
Dan
4 years ago
Reply to  Dan

Sorry, typo not C06.111 — I meant C07.611

Dan
Dan
11 months ago
Reply to  Dan

Mido, Hamilton, Rado use C07.611 variant of the base 80.611 (metal/ruby escapement & metal hairspring) 25J

Tom
Tom
2 years ago
Reply to  Dan

I have Certina C07.611 with 25J.
The watch supposed to have ETA 2824-2 but received Powermatic 80 instead 🙂

Nathan Cooper
Nathan Cooper
2 years ago
Reply to  Tom

How are you liking it so far? I’ve been leaning towards a Certina over a Tissot. But I don’t know a lot about the C07.612 movement and whether it uses a plastic escapement or not.

6B9C7AD1-BF52-4FEB-AE26-73ABE9FA75C4.jpeg
Ricardo
Ricardo
11 months ago
Reply to  Tom

Yes, I bought a Certina DS-1 Automatic that was supposed to have a ETA 2824-2, but it has Powermatic 80 and 25 jewels engraved on the back. What did I get?

Albert Gallagher
Albert Gallagher
4 years ago
Reply to  Wolf

Sorry, but if u have the Certina DS it has the 80.111 powermatic movement and the hairspring is not selicium but rather it is metal. The escapement wheel and fork in your watch are plastic. The powermatic 80 movement which was COSC certified (in some watches of the Swatch Group) was the 80.811.

Wolf
Wolf
4 years ago

Yes, it has come to my attention that the escapement is indeed synthetic…call it what you like, I don’t care either way so no bubbles burst.

The watch is great, phenomenal actually, and is still just as accurate at around +0.7 spd. Plastic/synthetic escapement, I don’t care, it’s not going to break or wear out so it’s fine.

BTW, “plastic” is a very generic term for anything that can be moulded.

Kill your snobbery!

Albert Gallagher
Albert Gallagher
4 years ago
Reply to  Wolf

Not snobbery Wolf, I think u have a great watch and it is an extraordinary value. I almost purchased the same until I found out there was a special edition of the Seastar which had the CO7.811 movement and silicium hairspring although it only comes with the blue dial and bezel ring. I think the black dial is to die for and believe it or not I was considering getting another, a model like yours to get it. I simply wanted to clear up the confusion regarding this watch and the various versions of the movement. I know that I… Read more »

Wolf
Wolf
4 years ago

No offence, my friend. I just don’t like the snobbery that has swamped this hobby and I suppose I mistook some comments for it.

There has been a lot of confusion over the movements and various images purporting to be such and such movement but nothing definitive.

Yeah, it’s a great watch indeed. Have you seen the newer Certina PH500M? Looks pretty good but I’m not certain about Orange. Either way, I think it would be great for actual use in the natural world.

Rob
Rob
4 years ago
Reply to  Wolf

Been following the conversation. Don’t you think the confusion within the swatch group brands and these Powermatic movements is intentional? They change things here and there and don’t seem to want us to know what’s what.

Wolf
Wolf
4 years ago
Reply to  Rob

That is quite possible. 😉

Albert Gallagher
Albert Gallagher
4 years ago
Reply to  Rob

I’ve wondered about this myself. One thing is for certain, if this was not their intention; they surely haven’t done anything to clarify things.

Albert Gallagher
Albert Gallagher
4 years ago
Reply to  Wolf

I haven’t seen this Certina Wolf but I saw a Certina diver that was emerald green which was quite striking, needless to say I wanted it but I have to curtail spending on watches for awhile.
Your correct about a lot of snobbery in the hobby, some of my favorite watches in my collection (I know this is heresy to many horologists) are quartz and Japanese such as my Citizen Nighthawk).

Wolf
Wolf
4 years ago

Yessir, we like what we like and all else is irrelevant.

I know the green Certina.

I like Casio Digitals. I’ll get one some day.
I like quartz as well and there’s some great looking watches in quartz for decent money. I like a couple of watches from Traser. I like the Citizen Altichron as well. I only have one quartz watch and I’ve had that for 22 years. lol

Dan
Dan
4 years ago
Reply to  Wolf

Since you’re such a fan of plastic, why not go all the way and just get a Swatch? You’ll save some money as well!

Wolf
Wolf
4 years ago
Reply to  Dan

I’m not a “fan” of plastics. It simply doesn’t bother me that of all of the individual parts that make up a watch two of them are synthetic and moulded. I know from experience with various other components that some plastics will outlast the metal counterpart. A watch is a tool, a device to give information about the suns location in the sky above and to use for keeping track of time. I like automatics as I they are the first type of watches I ever owned. I like nice things – but not luxurious – and reliable things. A… Read more »

Dan
Dan
4 years ago

Surprisingly, Tissot also makes a COSC version using the base C07.111 variant of the 80.111 in the PR100.

Jörg Lorenz
Jörg Lorenz
4 years ago

The C07 has a frequency of 21’600 b/h; 3 KHz

Roger Brown
Roger Brown
4 years ago

There is also huge confusion about if the 80.811 is 3hz or 4hz i have seen both quoted?. Does anyone actually know eta deny any knowledge and do not even list it

Rob
Rob
4 years ago
Reply to  Roger Brown

There’s no confusion imo. It’s listed at the top of the page as 3Hz. That’s what it’s supposed to be and how they got “80” hours power reserve out of it.

Glen Danford
Glen Danford
4 years ago

What about the 80.121, is this the one with the normal escapement? (not plastic, not silicium or whatever)

Albert Gallagher
Albert Gallagher
4 years ago
Reply to  Glen Danford

There are three variations of this movement: CO7.111, CO7.611 and CO7.811. The CO7.111 is the one with the plastic escapement fork and wheel and has 23 jewels instead of 25 due to the escapement fork being plastic and not containing jewels.

Dan
Dan
4 years ago
Reply to  Glen Danford

Calibers ending in 21 indicate a Day/Date movement as noted in the article above. 80.121 is the base model with the plastic escapement (Tissot PRC200), while 80.821 would be the Conventional escapement with Silicon hairspring in Day/Date versions (Mido Multifort or Commander).

Jonathan
Jonathan
3 years ago

Hello! Well I purchased a Tradition Powermatic 80 open heart Tissot watch and was expecting to get the c07.601 with black rotor (but not a must, they say in the company’s website color may change) and the writing “high tech escapement twenty five jewels 25 jewels” inside. But to my surprise The rotor was silver and in addition there was no “high tech escapement” writing at all, just “twenty five (…)”. On the Calibre itself it says c07.601, but I was wondering maybe it’s a fake or another production line… I don’t know what is the meaning of this variance.… Read more »

Jonathan
Jonathan
3 years ago
Reply to  Jonathan

This me adding a note, I posted the same response now with pictures above 🙂 please scroll up to see my newest comment with the mentioned picture.

Jonathan
Jonathan
3 years ago

Hello! Well I purchased a Tradition Powermatic 80 open heart Tissot watch and was expecting to get the c07.601 with black rotor (but not a must, they say in the company’s website color may change) and the writing “high tech escapement twenty five jewels 25 jewels” inside. But to my surprise The rotor was silver and in addition there was no “high tech escapement” writing at all, just “twenty five (…)”. On the Calibre itself it says c07.601, but I was wondering maybe it’s a fake or another production line… I don’t know what is the meaning of this variance.… Read more »

3F395ABB-AA59-4CB1-8388-B66F4A5FDF09.jpeg
C26174C2-CC46-4D35-9A9A-C5012B8143ED.jpeg
BEAFE8FF-0611-4570-A679-24449F894F42.jpeg
Jonathan
Jonathan
3 years ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Will also mention I bought it from an authorized seller 🙂 so it’s not supposed to be a counterfeit

Alex
Alex
3 years ago
Reply to  Jonathan

I have the same watch from the Tissot online store and it has the silver rotor too (black was pictured on the site). Out of curiosity do you hear small clicks every 2-3 rotations of the rotor similar to the clicks you hear when manually winding the watch?

Dan
Dan
3 years ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Have no fear, it’s authentic. The open heart version is yet another special variant, due to the fact that the pallet fork and wheel are exposed, and no one wants to see the cheap looking “High Tech” grey plastic parts. It would frankly make this otherwise fine timepiece look quite crappy. Therefore use good old “Low Tech” metal with Rubies pallet stones that are also lubricated with good old-fashioned oil. My, how did we ever get buy in the days before plastic was invented?

Rob
Rob
1 year ago
Reply to  Dan

Mostly geezers and boomers did the buying. Paid in cash too, they don’t believe in e-commerce nor in credit cards. Green paper over “plastic”.

Peter Laurence-Couzens
Peter Laurence-Couzens
3 years ago

Is it possible to replace an ETA C07.611 with an ETA 2824-2 top grade, and how would one go about getting this done?
(Please, and thank you) 🙂

Harvey
Harvey
3 years ago

There is only one way to find out! Supposedly the dimensions and everything on the ETA C07.611 vs ETA 2824-2 are the same. The only question I would have is the dial feet location. I would assume they’d match up, but if not you will have to have them moved. Lucky it should be easy enough to find a 2824-2 to swap, but not so sure about how you can find different grades. Someone else in this forum asked about buying a COSC grade 2836, but couldn’t find one with COSC. I should be straightforward if the C07 really is… Read more »

Peter Laurence-Couzens
Peter Laurence-Couzens
3 years ago
Reply to  Harvey

Thank you Harvey,
if it’s not a guaranteed straight drop in replacement I’d better start thinking in terms of a different watch. It’s a lot to gamble on buying a 2824-2 top grade (if they’re even available that is) only to find out it doesn’t fit. I’d then have a nice movement with no watch, and a watch with a movement that I don’t like.
thank you for your reply though.

Vincent Winstedt
Vincent Winstedt
3 years ago

Will you guys add the Powermatic 80.651 to the list?

Vincent Winstedt
Vincent Winstedt
3 years ago
Reply to  calibercorner

It’s currently in use in the new ”Certina DS-1 Big Date Powermatic 80” which came out pretty recently and also in the DS-1 Big Date Special Edition from late last year. It has got the new Nivachron Balance Spring.

Andrei Savescu
Andrei Savescu
3 years ago

Hello, I just bought a Tissot Couturier Powermatic 80 and it uses C07.141. Just to confirm as requested in article. There is also a marking, V8 AU37 on it.

xavier
xavier
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrei Savescu

i have this watch Tissot Couturier Powermatic 80 and it uses C07.141 as of Dec 1,2022 Have u had any issues with accuracy.? I love the watch.

Stevon
Stevon
3 years ago

Hello, I purchased the Tissot Gentleman Powermatic (25j) – I am a bit shocked about the absence of regulator… I am not a watch nerd but I know that with a regulator the accuracy of the watch can be tweaked … so does this mean that my watch needs to be sent back to Switzerland for a simple regulation every time when that’s needed ???

Jeff Lundquist
Jeff Lundquist
3 years ago
Reply to  Stevon

Whoa! I am here for the exact same reason! I was talking to my watch guy and he says there is no way to make adjustments to my watch because they built the movement without an adjuster! He said no one will open it because there’s nothing they can do once they get inside so if it is gaining or losing time it gets shipped back to Tissot headquarters. So what I wonder is the price of the watches are lower and then to make up for it they are forcing everyone to send their watches back for every little… Read more »

Peter Laurence-couzens
Peter Laurence-couzens
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeff Lundquist

I’m stuck with a Rado captain cook with a version of this movement. Likewise, I can’t get my usual watch guy to even look at it. Timekeeping in mine isn’t good, and I find the slower beat rate makes the sweep second hand very jerky. Overall I’m decidedly unimpressed.

deadlock
deadlock
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeff Lundquist

Tell your watch guy that the movement has a free-sprung balance wheel. There are two screws on the balance wheel that can be used to adjust its inertia.

DAVID A
DAVID A
2 years ago
Reply to  deadlock

If you have to tell this to your “watch guy”, you should look for another “watch guy”. I wouldn’t let that person learn a new skill using my watch.

xavier
xavier
1 year ago
Reply to  DAVID A

Fair point ,sir.

Zeke
Zeke
3 years ago
Reply to  Stevon

So there are good and bad reasons for this. The Powermatic movement is the first mass produced movement in the entry-to-mid-level price range to use a free sprung balance, which can offer significant improvements in timing accuracy and consistency at low power reserve. Free sprung balances can be found in higher end movements from the likes of Rolex, Omega, Tudor, etc. A free sprung balance always has a consistent, fixed spring length. They have to be regulated differently because curb regulators / index adjusters work by changing the spring length. The advantages are fundamentally more stable timekeeping and also fewer… Read more »

Dan
Dan
2 years ago
Reply to  Zeke

I sent my Special Edition Red Bull Air Race Hamilton into Swatch in Los Angeles for non-hand winding. It had the Powermatic 80. Rather than just service the keyless works they instead ordered an entirely new replacement movement and just swapped it out for a flat rate $200. Unfortunately it had the standard rotor. They couldn’t even be bothered with reinstalling the original rotor of the special edition. Even Swatch themselves do not want to do any service on this movement and would rather just Chuck it. And they don’t want anyone else that might be able to do a… Read more »

Rob
Rob
1 year ago
Reply to  Stevon

Yes, powermatic 80 can be regulated. Google is your friend. There are several youtube videos showing how it’s done, and doing it in switzerland is strictly optional.

Gordon Harris
Gordon Harris
3 years ago

Just had my T 085 407 A Powermatic 80 serviced by Swatch UK in Southampton for a very reasonable £140 + £18 courier return, they replaced the glass back, watch hands, winding spindle and seals plus 3 screws all of which were returned to me.
On restarting it has been running at regular +2 seconds a day for the last month, so I am am very pleased with the accuracy.
Tissot have now given the watch a full 2 year warranty again.

Pleased with the service and the watch.

Elandaloussi
Elandaloussi
3 years ago

Hi
I know a lot about polymers and plastic doesn’t mean anything. There is “plastic” with hardness near diamond others which resist at 1000 celcius deg. I think Tissot engineers have made a magnific job with the co7.111. I love XXI century.

Dan
Dan
3 years ago
Reply to  Elandaloussi

That being said, you will NEVER find plastic escapement parts in any movement other than Bargain basement brands under $1,000. If it was better than traditional materials they would be in Rolex and Patek.

EustonSquare
EustonSquare
2 years ago
Reply to  Dan

Mercedes Benz and Ferrari said the same, and then Tesla rolled up.

Dan
Dan
2 years ago
Reply to  EustonSquare

Seriously, Patek and Rolex have nothing to fear from Tissot! The industry will not go with cheap disposable movements just because Tissot claims them to be somehow superior. It is not a breakthrough. You would not stand a chance in a Poker game with Nick Hyek! BTW, My Ferarri will still be running long after your Tesla’s batteries have stopped holding a charge.

Rob
Rob
1 year ago
Reply to  Dan

you mean your carbon fiber ferrari with ceramic brakes, fiberglass panels, that uses synthetic oil? Nonsense. That car barely uses metal. Once we stop making gasoline your car will be as useful as a coal locomotive. Batteries, on the other hand, will be used forever, and can be replaced.

Dan
Dan
1 year ago
Reply to  Rob

A watch is not a high performance sports car. Completely different applications. But a Ferrari is built for speed, not for durability. A carbon fiber frame and body are light, but will shatter on impact and melt in a fire. With a conventional metal car, the damage is much less, so metal has the advantage in terms of sheer durability. As far as electric powered cars go, there are limitations to them permanently replacing gas powered cars. The supply and disposal of lithium batteries and capacity of the power grid for recharging them being issues.

tritri takes the lead
tritri takes the lead
1 year ago
Reply to  EustonSquare

Tesla is a microwave for noodlesoup
Ferrari is a reliable oven you use for christmas diner
But maybe i exaggerate

DAVID
DAVID
2 years ago
Reply to  Dan

You must also factor in perception and marketing. It’s not accurate to say engineered “plastic” isn’t used in higher-end pieces so it MUST be inferior. Their are other factors in that calculation. Not so many years ago, the high-end/pro camera industry went through a fundamental change from metal-bodied cameras to engineered plastics (FRP). Of course, there was outrage and howls of betrayal from the keyboard engineers who KNEW this was the end of quality in cameras; they were now disposable junk. Fast forward, and the use of lighter, more impact resilient, temp stable “plastic” is the accepted industry norm —… Read more »

Dan
Dan
2 years ago
Reply to  DAVID

Sorry I’m not convinced. Swatch only uses plastic escapements in their two lowest priced brands, Tissot and Certina. And looking further at Tissot, the plastic escapements are positioned only on their lowest priced models. Even the higher priced Tissot models don’t use plastic. They instead use the metal/ ruby escapement variant with silicon hair springs. So I think it’s safe to say that Tissot themselves consider that to be an upgrade to their plastic escapements and therefore charge more for it..

Todd
Todd
2 years ago
Reply to  Dan

Not sure what you’re on about but Patek, Rolex, and Omega have calibers with plastic hairsprings.

Dan
Dan
1 year ago
Reply to  Todd

Ummm….no. That is completely wrong…

DAVID
DAVID
2 years ago
Reply to  Dan

Your comments are consistent with the camera analogy above; some people just have trouble accepting unconventional engineering. Manufacturers also recognize this and roll out new materials and tech carefully. They also know some people will take time to accept new things, and it’s not surprising if they initially separate their top offerings from the hesitancy. They may even use that wariness as a marketing strategy.

Obviously, you will buy whatever you believe is best, but don’t be alarmed when engineered plastics become more mainstream across the industry as its benefits become obvious and accepted, and its imagined flaws never materialize.

Rob
Rob
1 year ago
Reply to  DAVID

Yes, some people lack mental plasticity and although generalizations are dumb, regretfully the generation collectively referred to as “boomers” in our society are usually like this (not all of them but it seems like a majority at least from my perspective) and don’t handle change appropriately.

Dan
Dan
1 year ago
Reply to  Rob

OR maybe boomers just have more experience, and are thus better able to discern real quality that is proven instead of accepting anything new as being automatically better. Not that manufacturers would try to influence people to accept lower quality in order increase profits. But skepticism is often healthy, Just a thought….

Rob
Rob
1 year ago
Reply to  Dan

Or…. They’re just smart and they know the people that buy their lower tier movements in low cost watches are not likely to have them serviced so plastic prolongs their life as much as possible before they are discarded in a decade, and people who buy their upper tier movements will have them serviced so plastic may not be necessary to prolong life for that application and nivacron or other non magnetic alloy may make more sense even at the cost of needing service at the 5 year mark.

Mike
Mike
11 months ago
Reply to  Dan

You are incorrect. Certina uses only higher grade powermatic 80 with 25 jewels and with regular escapement, only with some models using nivichron escapement. The same with Mido, and even Rado.

Jobi Qualter
Jobi Qualter
11 months ago
Reply to  Mike

Correct, it couldn’t be said better. 🙂

Dan
Dan
11 months ago
Reply to  Mike

So brands can offer more than just one movement, as an online search only will quickly show you 🙂 You’ll find plenty of Certina C07.111 variants of the 80.111 base model (23 Jewels). The current Certina website even lists a DS-1 with the 80.111. As I said, Tissot and Certina are the only brands I have ever seen to offer this movement.

Mike
Mike
11 months ago
Reply to  Dan

Nope. Go to “Watch base” and educate yourself about calibers used in Certina. Tissot in some models uses your mentioned caliber indeed, but not Certina.

Dan
Dan
11 months ago
Reply to  Mike

Just to humor you, I did just that and had no problem pulling up an ETA C07.111 with 23 Jewels on my first attempt on the Certina – C0294073608100 DS-1 Powermatic 80. (BTW, classy move mentioning the competitor’s website here!) I really didn’t need to, but I confirmed that all the DS-1 Powermatics listed (well over a dozen), had the same movement as well with the exception of the Powermatic Big Dates. I would be happy to share photos and links to reviews of other various Certina models that are newer than the ones listed on that site with the same… Read more »

Dan
Dan
11 months ago
Reply to  Mike

I went there and they agree with me… so you need to look closer. All the DS and DS-1 PW80 except the big dates have the 23 jewel Hi tech escapement C07.111. Read the next post down from Andre where Certina confirms this!

Mike
Mike
11 months ago
Reply to  Dan

No, you haven’t been there otherwise you would already know that Certina uses only 25 jewel calibers that out of three options those used start with number 6… which means “standard” escapement wheel without plastic. There are other 25 jewel movements used that Certina emphasises nivichoron. I think you are just a troll.

Dan
Dan
11 months ago
Reply to  Mike

Calling people names will not change the facts or gain you any more credibility in this forum. I am a watch manufacturer and have a good track record of offering helpful detailed information in forums. I happen to have a good knowledge of this particular movement having studied it over many years since its introduction. While some opinions here are more informed than others and up for debate, what you attempting to disprove is something so well documented that it that it is quite frankly ridiculous. End of dicussion.

John
John
11 months ago
Reply to  DAVID

High end cameras are still made of magnesium alloy.

DAVID A
DAVID A
2 years ago
Reply to  Dan

Perception and prejudice are likely more of a driver than actual performance. Many people initially made the same assumptions about engineered plastic in high-end cameras and lenses. But, of course, these plastics are now preferred because they are very strong, more resistant to impact, lighter, and more stable as temperatures change. Manufacturers will often give people whatever they want, even if the alternatives are just as good, or even superior. In spite of excellent performance characteristics, there is still a stigma associated with “plastic”.

Dan
Dan
1 year ago
Reply to  DAVID A

I suppose it depends on whether you prefer dented aluminum camera cases or shattered plastic ones! Metal in consumer goods is usually considered a far more premium material than plastic, no matter how good the plastic may be. That is the reason Apple products feature metal cases exclusively and minimize plastic parts and is probably a major factor in their dominant sales position.

Andre
Andre
3 years ago

SGRDE CC-Certina.Deutschland • CC-Certina.Deutschland@swatchgroup.com
Dear Mr. Martinez,

Thank you for your email and your interest in our DS 1 Powermatic.

The escapement built into the movement is synthetic. By using this high-tech synthetic escapement, the anti-magnetic properties of the movement have been significantly improved, which ultimately leads to improved accuracy. The accuracy of this movement is -2 / + 8 seconds per day and when fully wound it has a power reserve of 80 hours.

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[…] Hamilton caliber H-10 (H10) automatic watch movement. For now, find more info on ETA C07.111. […]

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[…] Tissot Powermatic 80 full caliber listing […]

Sina
Sina
3 years ago

Powermatic 80 is free sprung and it can be regulated by turning screws on balance wheels

Herold Califax
Herold Califax
3 years ago
Reply to  Sina

That’s for an expert to do. They are trying to make it without a regulator to make it seems like it can’t be tampered with. Also to make it look like such an advanced movement it doesn’t need regulated.

Sina
Sina
3 years ago
Reply to  Herold Califax

Here is how to regulate powermatic 80
https://youtu.be/oPf042EIyF0

Dan
Dan
11 months ago
Reply to  Sina

I’ve never tried to do this, and understand a special tool is needed to prevent the balance wheel pivots from snapping. Some watchmakers won’t attempt it, and the plastic escapement versions remove the “Tick Tock” and make it so quiet it is very difficult to pick up on a timing machine to adjust. Not to mention the plastic parts are pretty much a throw away and must be replaced for servicing. Considering all this, you really have to use authorized service centers if you’re planning to keep the base Powermatics from Tissot and Certina going a long time. Even then,… Read more »

Evgen
Evgen
3 years ago

Hello guys, is it possible to replace nh35 with this c07.111 movement? And where to buy this movement?

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[…] (de ahí el sobrenombre Big-Date). En cambio, el actual Day-Date equipa el conocido calibre Powermatic 80 en su versión con fecha y calendario semanal. Como consecuencia de ello, la esfera del Big Date […]

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[…] ejemplo, el Tissot Powermatic 80 tiene – tal como sugiere su nombre – una reserva de marcha de 80 horas. Esto se […]

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[…] surface from unwanted scratches. From the exhibition caseback you can take a peek at the venerable powermatic 80 – with gold-plated cogs and decorated rotor – which gives it a considerable power […]

Roman
Roman
2 years ago

tanto los powermatic como el h10 y los powereseve mido y rado el unico parecido que tienen con el 2824 es estetico la misma ubicacion de tren de rodage y modulo de carga automatica es totalmente otro calibre incluso la base del mismo es diferente se a modificado todo el volante el cual si que lleva raqueta de regilacion no se suele ver por que esta ubicada por devajo del modulo de carga pero mirando con una luz se ve se a modificado la posicion de la ancora y la vase de sujeccion el volante tiene dos tornillos de equilibrio… Read more »

Pep
Pep
2 years ago
Reply to  Roman

El powermatic 80, en cualquiera de sus variantes, NO lleva raqueta de regulación, es incierto lo que dices. Es un escape de espiral libre, que se regula modificando el momento de inercia, que se consigue actuando sobre los tornillos que se encuentran en los brazos del volante. Pero no lleva raqueta alguna, no desinformemos.

Taylan
Taylan
2 years ago

Does anyone have information about the accuracy and precision of Tissot Calibre Powermatic 80.811 COSC movement?

Alain
Alain
2 years ago

Very nice topic I’m. Diver for passion and the watch is a very important tool for diving . I’m interested in the Tissot Seastar 2000 Pro for its very readable screen and perfect crown . The only doubt is about the PM80 23 jewels movement . But for the price there is no concurrency . An Oris or Omega diving watch cost a lot more . Great topic here

Ilupis
Ilupis
2 years ago
Reply to  Alain

Have you checked Certina Ds action diver? It has the 25jewel version

Marcelo Lorca
Marcelo Lorca
2 years ago

I have a Tissot t-One with Powermatic 80.121 (ETA C07.141)

Ashik Mohd
Ashik Mohd
2 years ago

Hi I’m a relatively new to automatic watches. I bought a Tissot with this movement but due to the pandemic I barely ever wear it. Because of this I think, the watch ran out of power. I wear this maybe 3 to 4 days a month now. I don’t know how to manually wind it. Any help? Thanks.

Stephen
Stephen
2 years ago
Reply to  Ashik Mohd

Wind it 40 rotations while in position 1 and it’ll be fine

Tony
Tony
2 years ago

Hello

i recently purchased the Tissot T-One Automatic Day Date from Jomashop. They advertised it with the eta 2834 but i believe it has the Powermatic 80.121 (ETA C07.141) with a black rotor. I checked and it is beating at 28800 vph. Does tissot alter these movements or is this likely a fake? Thanks for your time.

Dan
Dan
11 months ago
Reply to  Tony

It’s legit. Joma is known to pick up the wrong or outdated info from other models.

Gabriello
Gabriello
2 years ago

I own a Tissot Seastar2000 with this movement and it has a stabile 87 hours power reserve.

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[…] Additionally, Tissot’s watches have sapphire dial windows. Once again, sapphire dial windows are pretty much mandatory for high end or luxury watches. As far as movements go, many of Tissot’s mechanical watches use an ETA based movement called the Powermatic 80. […]

Fernando
Fernando
2 years ago

Very good information!

CORNEL VLAD
CORNEL VLAD
2 years ago

Hi, my name is Cornel and I have a question hoping to get an answer from you guys. I have a Tissot prx swissmatic 80 and I would like to know how to regulate 3-4 seconds/day as my watch is losing time. Is it possible to do it?
Thanks

Dan
Dan
11 months ago
Reply to  CORNEL VLAD

It’s possible but for only 3 or 4 sec/day it’s not worth really worth learning how to do it correctly… You can easily end up making it worse or damage it. It sounds easy, but needs to be done in at least 3 different positions so that it averages out correctly. I manufacture watches for a living, but rarely go to the trouble to regulate my own watches that I wear unless wildly out of spec…

Thomas Hawk
Thomas Hawk
2 years ago

I can attest to the fact that the 23-jewel Powermatic 80 is also present in the Tissot Seastar 2000 Professional.

Robert Matuli
Robert Matuli
1 year ago

I own a 23 jewel Powermatic 80 Tissot PRX with the plastic escapement. I asked about service cost when I bought the watch. I was told that I should not worry about it. They just change the whole movement at lower cost than a normal service. That is the idea behind the 23 jewel version. So if the plastic escapement lasts as long as a normal service interval, the lower end movement will be cheaper to own and service.

Dan
Dan
11 months ago
Reply to  Robert Matuli

BINGO! Tissot is going with the Seiko approach with the Powermatic 80. And they need to cut costs wherever possible. To me, the best of the few advantages of plastic parts is that there is no “Tick Tock” sound. This is a little advertised feature that could by itself could attract many people! Most people buying a basic Tissot model will not know about, much less be care about the “High Tech Escapement” using rather ordinary plastic parts instead of “low tech” jeweled metal ones! It does have a warranty, after all!

Ronald
Ronald
1 year ago

You’re exceptionally professional and highly proficient. You’re my “go to guy” as it were. I love the look of the Tissot Le Locle but you’ve swung me towards the Gentelman because of the Silicium. No I’m store sales person here in South Africa can do that. I’m rather great full to you.

Harlaous
Harlaous
1 year ago

Does seastar 1000 powermatic 80 have nivachron spring? It is not written on the page but it has the exact same movement code as the ones that has nivachron spring such as seastar 2000 and prx.

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[…] fondo de exhibición nos permite admirar el Tissot Powermatic 80, equipado con una masa oscilante […]

Albert Hall
Albert Hall
1 year ago

Am I correct in supposing that this movement is not designed to be serviced but to be swopped out??. Am I also correct in supposing that this movement is machine assembled and therefore within’ spitting distance of, price wise, an upper echelon QUARTZ movement. On another note I bought my aged uncle a cheapo , I seem to remember it cost £GB29.00 on offer CITIZEN ECO watch [ light activated] back in 2004 . As of today that watch is still running without interruption [ie 18 years] and keeping time to within a seconds or two a day . It’s… Read more »

Atiq
Atiq
1 year ago

I am interesting for a watch having automatic mechanism but show its movement on dial like quartz( each second one step forward). Any affordable Tissot model existing in market.

Enrico
Enrico
1 year ago

Hum, It’s clearly inertially regulated. I’m not sure how you could have missed that. Correct that, please. Cheers

Hubert
Hubert
1 year ago
Reply to  Enrico

inertially regulated?

Enrico
Enrico
1 year ago
Reply to  Hubert

How do you regulate a free sprung watch? How do you regulate a Patek Gyromax? Or a Rolex Microstella? By tightening or loosening the screws on the balance wheel thus changing the intertia of the balance wheel. No Swatch group company uses a rachet regulator anymore. They all went free sprung. Breguet, Blancpain, Omega. And then also outside of the group Tudor, Rolex, Patek, Audemars.

Dan
Dan
11 months ago
Reply to  Enrico

While MOST Swatch group watches are going free-sprung, I believe there are still a FEW using the eta2824 and 2892 movements with the ectachron regulator. Longines for one, still uses the good old eta 2824-2 with ectachron regulator, in the Conquest line. But the higher-end Longine models with the L888.4 and A31.L11 based on the ETA 2892 do use free-sprung versions, similar to the Omega 2500s variant. However, the Omega 1120, if still in use, does use an ectachron regulator.

Enrico
Enrico
10 months ago
Reply to  Dan

You’re definitely correct. There’s some Tissot and maybe Hamilton powered by the classics Unitas/ETA 6497 or 6498. I think Omega may have phased out all the 2500s with the new DeVille releases but at the time of my comment they still had a few percentage of model at catalog with the first Co-Axial calibers.

Dan
Dan
1 year ago

This review is incorrect in that it is a free sprung watch (like any Rolex or other high end movement) and can easily be adjusted and repaired. It is regulated by moving the screws on the balance wheel (again, just like any other high end movement). It is eerily accurate, or at least mine has been for years.

John J Fanning
John J Fanning
1 year ago

I’ve had my Tissot Ballade with the 80.811 COSC movement for about a month now. The more I use it the more I like it and the more I learn about it the more I like it. Briefly, timekeeping is stunning, even in the COSC universe. I’ve never before seen a perfect tracing on my timegrapher; 0.0 ms beat error, 0 sec/day time error, and if the room is exceptionally quiet, not a single pixel out of place on the graph. Daily wear timekeeping is such that it’s a fun game to play “position on the nightstand” to pick up… Read more »

Marko S
Marko S
1 year ago

Hey guys.
I came across a video on YouTube of a guy swapping the plastic escapement and pallet fork with metal ones on a C07.111( Powermatic 80.111) movement. Does anyone by any change know if the metal escapement and pallet fork from the other C07s fit this particular movement?

Marko S
Marko S
1 year ago
Reply to  Marko S
Enrico
Enrico
10 months ago
Reply to  Marko S

They’ll fit, however it’s unclear where you would get the spare parts.

OT
OT
1 year ago

Ultimately I decided to go for a watch with the Powermatic 80 Silicium movement because I had heard too many horror stories about Sellita movements in sub-1K watches. It seems even after the SW-200 update there are still many of these movements having problems with broken or bent gears.

John
John
11 months ago
Reply to  OT

Never heard of that.

Rob
Rob
1 year ago

In case anyone is looking, the lift angles for this whole family is 50 degrees.

Dan
Dan
11 months ago
Reply to  Rob

Thanks! Makes sense, it’s the same as the eta 2824-2…

Jame
Jame
1 year ago

I just did my own research under the section of “PLASTIC PARTS” you state that The COSC rated Powermatic 80.811 found in the Tissot Ballade does not. Well after looking at that same watch it says on the back of the watch “silicon balance spring” so this watch does indeed use the silicon balance spring. Outside of that thank you for the great article.

Dan
Dan
11 months ago
Reply to  Jame

Silicon as used in watches is not the same thing as plastic… You will find molded plastic parts not in the balance spring but in the pallet fork and wheel in the 80.111 movements marked “High Tech Escapement” having only 23 jewels. 80.811 Movements marked as “Si or Silicon Balance Spring” have regular metal escapements with 25 jewels (wheel and fork) but with Silicon (not plastic) balance springs.

Enrico
Enrico
10 months ago
Reply to  Jame

Having a teflon escape wheel and fork isn’t the same things as having a silicon hairspring. The hairspring isn’t part of the escapement. Plastic isn’t made of silicium. Plastic is made of carbon as it’s derived from petroleum. Silicon is the element most known for is presence in quartz (very popular as sand grains) and glass. Your phone CPU isn’t made of plastic. They’re two completely different things.

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