Dandong Caliber Sl 3006 Peacock Sl 3001

Dandong/Peacock caliber SL-3006

Dandong Caliber Sl 3006 Peacock Sl 3001

Manufacturer Dandong/Peacock Watch Factory
Caliber Number SL-3006, SL3006
Base Caliber
SL-3001
Diameter
26mm
Height
5.8mm thick
Jewels 32
Power Reserve 41 hours
Lift Angle
51.5 degrees
Vibrations Per Hour 28,800 bph, 4Hz
Components
228 parts
Hacking Yes
Quick Date Yes
Winding
Bi-directional
Functions Hours, minutes, small seconds at 6:00 (date at 3:00 also possible)
Country of Manufacture Dandong, China
Known Models
Atelier Wen Porcelain Odyssey (Ji & Hao models)

The Dandong/Peacock caliber SL-3006 is a 32 jewel automatic movement that is made in China. It features a Côtes de Genève finish on the rotor with perlage on top of the plates. You may have seen this movement written as the SL3006 but the correct way to spell it is SL-3006 with a hyphen.

SL-3006 VS SL-3001

The caliber SL-3006 is based on the SL-3001. The main difference is that the SL-3006 shown here has a small seconds subdial at 6:00 and the SL-3001 has a central seconds hand. Both movements offer a date complication.

Atelier Wen

The photos in this post are of the Dandong caliber SL-3006 found exclusively in a Porcelain Odyssey model by the microbrand watch company Atelier Wen.

Here is what Atelier Wen says about this movement:

“Pictured here is a special variation of the Dandong SL-3006 made exclusively for Atelier Wen. The modifications are the removal of the whole date mechanism (hence no phantom click), and some much tighter manufacturing tolerances. This special grade is exclusive to Atelier Wen.”

And an interesting excerpt from their Reddit post:

“The movement powering our watches comes from the Dandong Watch Factory, which is located in the North-East of the country. It is one of the largest players in the Chinese watch industry (along with Seagull, Shanghai and Hangzhou), and, after having spent years observing from the inside how this industry works, I was able to assess that the products coming out of the Dandong Watch Factory are quite likely the most qualitative ones in the Middle Kingdom. In fact, lately a number of Seagull managers who were tired and fed up of the slow nature of decision making and bureaucracy at the company “defected” to Dandong in order to implement the things that they could not achieve at Seagull. Lots of new movements have since been created and their positioning is more premium than the one of the three other giants. The calibre that we are using is the Peacock SL3006, a derivate of the Peacock SL3000, which is a clone of the ETA 2824-2. Our movement features an additional platter so as to incorporate a seconds hand at 6 o’clock. The movement has 32 jewels and beats at 28,800BPH. The top parts of the movements have a perlage finish, and côtes de Genève are applied on the rotor.”

Accuracy Rating

According to Atelier Wen, the caliber SL-3006 they use is regulated in 5 positions and each movement is tested for one month. This helps to achieve the claimed accuracy of +/- 10 seconds per day.

Here is a comment posted by Atelier Wen on Instagram:

“The movement we are using is the Peacock SL-3006, from the Dandong Watch Factory. It is a derivative of the Peacock SL-3000, which itself is an ETA 2824-2 clone. I’ve had the chance to get an extensive insider view of the Chinese horological industry, and to tour most of the country’s manufactures. By far, the Dandong Watch Factory was the very best. The movement has 32 jewels, 228 components, 41hrs power reserve and a high frequency of 28,800bph. It undergoes a month-long testing at the Dandong Watch Factory, ensuring a daily deviation of max +/-10seconds/day. Afterwards, it is fine-tuned by our final assembler (Fiyta), who also adjusts it to 5 positions.”

And from their Indigogo campaign:

“We are not just using a standard movement, but have negotiated with Peacock for a Top-grade SL 3006. This one is machined to a higher degree of accuracy and tested continuously for close to a month to ensure high durability and a daily accuracy of within 10 seconds. After leaving the factory, the movements are sent to our assembler, Fitya, who once more ensures their accuracy by testing and regulating them in five positions. In fact, Peacock is so confident in the quality of their movements that they have extended for us the industry-standard 1-year warranty to a 2-year warranty.”

Dandong Caliber Sl 3006 Atelier Wen

A Note on Confusing Manufacturer/Caliber Names

As with most Chinese movements, one of the biggest downfalls is the confusion and lack of concise information about the manufacturer and calibers. For example, is this movement a Dandong, or a Peacock (also written as PCK), or a Dandong Peacock? While researching, we stumbled upon Liaoning Dandong Watch Factory, Liaoning Watch Co Ltd, Dandong Movement Factory, Peacock Movement Factory, Liaoning Peacock Watch Company, Liaoning Peacock Watch Group, also written as LPWG, which happens to be in Dandong City – with an office address in Hong Kong?

As shown above, even Atelier Wen seems to be confused. They refer to their movement as an SL3006, SL 3006, and SL-3006… as well as calling it a movement from Dandong Watch Factory and from Peacock.

For Chinese movement houses to move forward and garner more attention (and respect) the watch community first has to know how to identify the manufactures and calibers with ease. If any Chinese movement manufacturers are reading this, consistency is key and simplicity goes a long way! Watch movements are already complicated (pun!) so don’t complicate things more with inconsistencies and an overabundance of wording/branding. One name per company, one caliber number per movement.

Additional Resources:

Caliber submitted by Robin from Atelier Wen | @atelierwenluxury

Is the Dandong/Peacock caliber SL-3006 any good? Share your opinions, experiences and watches below... Keep comments respectful and follow our community guidelines.

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Aaron
Aaron

This is interesting to see Chinese movements making so much progress. In some ways the finish looked better than an ETA. The notch on the regulator screw is also similar but the holder ring around the incabloc is not as well finished as some ETA.

Paul Hamilton
Paul Hamilton

The holder ring you’re pointing out is actually called the Bloc, as in Inabloc. Panerai and some other brands have Blocs that are carved out more and finished to perfection.

Ben
Ben

This is so great to see Chinese watches being accepted and a brand being transparent about using a China made movement. If the Chinese factories continuously improving their quality like this then Swiss watch makers will be competing with Made in China on the dial for luxury watches in the future.

Kevin
Kevin

Ben, you’ll have a long wait for that to happen. Not in your lifetime. The Chinese won’t even buy them.

Kevin
Kevin

Sorry, I try to purchase NOTHING made in China. I’ve never seen anything of good quality from China. In addition, the pet food, milk, baby formula, toys, and Heprin issues, have killed people and animals. They have no shame. Slave labor, too. No thank you. I’ll stick with companies that have proven track records of 100 years and more.

Ben
Ben

How is it is even possible to purchase NOTHING made in China? And what do what watch factories have to do with other industries? America didn’t sell horse meat as pet food? And salmonella in the produce? American businesses are the ones using slave labor because they go to China looking for the cheapest products.

Kevin
Kevin

I do my best to buy nothing made in China. My clothing is almost all American or Italian. Some is made in other countries. I look at the label. It’s not that hard. If I really don’t need it or I need it, I’ll take extra time to look. There was a great point made by someone else on here. The Chinese making movements, IS like making fake watches. There are virtually no Chinese watchmakers. Their movements are going in crap like Stauer and other brands you’ve never heard of and the plethora of fake Rolex and other brands. It’s… Read more »

Kevin
Kevin

Ben, I don’t mind spending more money to buy something NOT produced with slave labor. Just like I’d pay higher taxes to help protect the elderly and infirm. I chose not to pay companies that use labor in China or as many other countries that abuse their citizens to the benefit of a few. Don’t get me wrong, it happens here and was exacerbated by the recent tax cuts.

Jim Falconer
Jim Falconer

100 years ago Swiss watches were absolutely garbage. Most of the Swiss watch industry exists thanks to China making up for the other 49%. Your comment is misguided and irrelevant to this discussion.

Kevin
Kevin

Jim, you’re flat out incorrect. You’re irrelevant and misguided. Chinese movements have been around how long? And their quality is how good? The entire Chinese industrial machine puts out crap products. Chinese people won’t even buy them. Wal Mart had closed several stores due to this. They don’t even buy their own products. I can find that report, I’m sure, if I need to.

John
John

Have you ever been to China, Kevin? And Jim is correct: 100 years ago, Swiss watches were seen as very cheap alternative to American ones…

Kevin
Kevin

John, I have ZERO desire to visit China. What does me having been there have to do with anything? Have you been to every country of origin for everything you own? What a ridiculous question. In addition, virtually every great complication was invented in Europe, Swiss watchmakers in particular. Also, how many of these Great American companies still exist? Maybe one. The materials aren’t the same. If I’m not mistaken, the only “American” watchmaker that’s been around for a hundred years, is really Swiss now. Why do you ask take such offense at my comment? It’s odd. It’s personal preference.… Read more »

Antonio
Antonio

Thanks for this article , but the reason I’m hesitant to buy any Chinese movements is because doing so is basically the same as buying into the fake watch industry. If there are 3 main movement factories in China and they are making so many movements each year, who do you guys think they are making them for? Fakes! There aren’t that many Chinese brands or Chinese watches so they are probably supplementing sales with making fake movements for fake watches. Don’t believe it? Then tell me, how can the fake ETAs be so good and where are they coming… Read more »

John
John

Well, then, why don’t you stop buying watches with Miyota or Seiko movements too? You’d be surprised by the hefty number of NH35, 8215 and 9015 in fake watches…
Let me tell you another thing: most of these Chinese ETA clones actually end up in Switzerland… But that’s very much controversial.

Kevin
Kevin

MOST of these end up in Switzerland? And you know this how? Trump and the Russians told you so?

John
John

Nope. Having worked for various OEMs, sourcing and private label companies, and even for large brands, over the past 15 years or so did tell me so.

Antonio
Antonio

I see what you’re saying even though what you’re saying isn’t what I’m talking about here. Any cheap movement can find it’s way into a cheap fake… cheap fake means it’s obvious. What I’m talking about is that these ETA copies are used in the fakes that are more difficult to tell. I don’t think you read my comment right… I’m saying I think it’s possible the watch factories like this one work hand in hand with replica makers and knowingly supply moments to them with intentions of being as much a replica as possible. Fakes are not coming from… Read more »

John
John

Sorry, I indeed misunderstood your point. But again, I don’t think that these high quality ETA copies are the “consequence” of the fake industry. These high-quality fakes are a very niche thing; maybe a few dozens of thousands of units per year, which, in the grand scheme of things, is nothing. You have to keep in mind that the Chinese watch industry is the largest in the world. Creating a new movement costs hundreds of millions of RMB, and takes a few years. This small volume cannot justify it alone at all. If that was this easy… we would have… Read more »

Antonio
Antonio

You said “most of these Chinese ETA clones actually end up in Switzerland” but how do you know this?

gregorio
gregorio

Uh, guys, can we please focus on the important things here like, why if this is ETA clone, does this movement need 7 extra jewels??

Omar
Omar

Look at that regulator screw notch. Exactly like the 2824’s. A momement like this and with ETA’s stopping selling movements, is asking for a decline in Swiss watches industry in the future. Just my opinion.

Adonis
Adonis

This looks like a promising movement and Swiss alternative. What other watches is this in can anybody tell me?